Take Action on Haitian TPS

Call Governor Baker:

Haitian TPS is due to expire in July.  If TPS is allowed to expire, 50,000 Haitian TPS holders in the US will lose their status, be unable to work and will face deportation.  We can take action to stop this.

A decision could happen as early as next week, May 18.  We have from now until then to take action
Call Governor Baker 617.725.4005   Call Script (scroll down for email format)

 

My name is ____ ___ and I’m calling from ___city/town______.  I am also a person of faith, belonging to the  (Faith community, if applicable) community.    I’m calling to ask you to contact the secretary of Homeland Security, General John Kelly and Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson and advocate for an 18 month extension of the Haitian TPS (Temporary Protected Status).

Extending Haitian TPS is in the national interest.  The people in the Haitian community are our neighbors.  Our children go to school together and many Haitian people provide critical home health care and work as nurse’s aides.  Haitian owned stores contribute to our local economies and many of these hard working individuals provide invaluable economic support to family members still in Haiti, preventing further destabilization of the country.

I ask for your compassion and for you to take action.  Please, don’t abandon this vibrant community that adds so much to our Commonwealth.  Thank you.

Email Text

To the Honorable Governor Baker,

I’m calling to ask you to contact the Secretary of Homeland Security, General John Kelly and Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, and advocate for an 18 month extension of the Haitian TPS (Temporary Protected Status).  As a person of faith and a member of the  ____ community, I implore you to be compassionate and take action.

Extending Haitian TPS is in the national interest.  The people in the Haitian community are our neighbors.  Our children go to school together and many Haitian people provide critical home health care and work as nurse’s aides.  Haitian owned stores contribute to our local economies and many of these hard working individuals provide invaluable economic support to family members still in Haiti, preventing further destabilization of the country.

Why we need to Support the People in the Haitian Community:

1) We promised to Welcome Haitians

Allowing Haitian TPS holders to remain safely in the U.S. until Haiti is sufficiently stable honors our closely-held moral, religious, and American values to stand for the human rights and dignity of all people, here and abroad.

To allow TPS for Haiti to expire would mean turning our backs on the vulnerable Haitians whom we pledged to welcome, and would place considerable burdens on the country as it struggles to recover from multiple natural disasters.

2) Conditions in Haiti Remain Dire

TPS was created to provide protection to those in the United States when it is unsafe for their return home – precisely the conditions Haiti faces today.

Since the 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit in 2010 and displaced 1.5 million people, food insecurity, disease, and instability persist in Haiti.[1]

United Nations humanitarian efforts following the earthquake introduced cholera – now the worst cholera epidemic in the world – killing at least 9,200 people and sickening nearly 100,000 others to date.[2]

60,000 people are still homeless as a result of the earthquake and living in camps seven years later.[3]

Thousands of people continue to be sickened by Cholera  every year, which leads to severe dehydration, blood sugar shock, and organ failure and can kill a person in a matter of hours.[4]

Hurricane Matthew struck Haiti in October 2016, which devastated the country and impeded Haiti’s recovery. The category 4 hurricane impacted two million people and resulted in $2.7 billion in damage, approximately 32 percent of Haiti’s GDP.[5]

The events of the past seven years in Haiti are unprecedented and the country remains unstable despite substantial efforts and progress made by the Haitian people and international community. Although poverty has plagued Haiti for generations, the temporary and extreme conditions in the country are a direct result of multiple environmental disasters and “the worst cholera outbreak in recent history,” as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[6] The country needs more time to recover before Haitian nationals in the U.S. can safely return.

3) We Gain More by Honoring Our Promise

Spending US tax dollars to deport people, and by doing so, losing their economic contribution to our communities makes no sense.  Worse, it’s cruel, shameful and immoral.  Our Haitian neighbors have demonstrated their value to our communities through hard work and by adding value to our society. 

I ask for your compassion and for you to take action.  Please, don’t abandon this vibrant community that adds so much to our Commonwealth.

Sincerely,

Name & Address

[1] Haiti Earthquake Fast Facts, CNN, Dec. 28, 2016, available at http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/12/world/haiti-earthquake-fast-facts/

[2] Cholera Deaths in Haiti Could Far Exceed Official Count, NY Times, March 18, 2016, available at   https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/19/world/americas/cholera-deaths-in-haiti-could-far-exceed-official-count.html?_r=0

[3] Haiti earthquake victims still homeless, struggling to rebuild six years after disaster, ABC News, Jan. 12, 2016, available at

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-13/haiti-struggles-to-rebuild-6-years-after-earthquake/7085174

[4] U.N. Admits Role In Haiti Cholera Outbreak That Has Killed Thousands, NPR News, Aug. 18, 2016, available at http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/08/18/490468640/u-n-admits-role-in-haiti-cholera-outbreak-that-has-killed-thousands

 [5] U.N. News Centre, UN calls for support to recovery plan as Haiti loses $2.7 billion in Hurricane Matthew, March 7, 2017, available at http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=56294#.WNsqwZArLrd

[6] Cholera in Haiti, https://www.cdc.gov/cholera/haiti/index.html

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